AnyEveryLittleThings, Projects, Activities & Events

Moriyama Kasuri Factory 久留米絣 森山絣工房

Thanks to Kayoko san from the Matsuo Washi Factory, we get to visit to the famed Moriyama Kasuri Factory 久留米絣 森山絣工房 and learn about the Japan traditional Kurume Kasuri (Shibori Textile). This technique has a long history spanning over 200 years and originated by a girl Den Inoue, whose curiosity inspired her to create Kasuri, technique to twine and dye vertical threads and horizontal ones together so as to weave up a design. Kurume Kasuri is now a nationally-designated Important intangible cultural property.

Kasuri requires about 30 procedures, from Pattern designing, Tekukuri (Hand Twining), Aizome (Indigo Dye), to Teori (Hand Weaving). Moriyama Kasuri factory is well known for these and titled as the Kogara no Moriyama (Elaborately Pattern Moriyama).

We met the head of the family Torao Moriyama, the fifth master Tetsuhiro Moriyama and her amazing wife who taught us the Kasuri Workshop.

I documented these enriching experience into videos and showcased together with my art installation at the Studio Kura Residency Exhibition.

Do check out their facebook page here.

The piece that I made during the workshop.
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AnyEveryLittleThings, Projects, Activities & Events

Matsuo Washi Factory 松尾和紙工場

Went for a day trip together with 2 other artists to the Matsuo Washi Factory 松尾和紙工場 at Yame, Kyushu, Japan. Meet the most bubbly and welcoming owner, Kayoko san, who picked us up from the Hainuzuka train station. Glad that the Japanese that I studied is working well and she speaks a little English too which made the whole trip was so relaxing and enjoyable.

Had a wonderful tour around the factory and had an in-depth understanding on the traditional crafting technique of making the beautiful Washi papers. We spent more than an hour and a half choosing and purchasing the papers, but Kayoko san is always patience and addressing to our requests. It was way passed lunch time when we left the place and thanks to her generous hospitality that we didn’t even realized it.

Kayoko san arranged another tour at her friend place, the Moriyama Kasuri Factory and offered to drive us there and stop along the way for lunch.  She brought us to a local udon shop which is really delicious and the least we could do is to buy her lunch. Really appreciate that she stayed with us during the Indigo dye tour and helped us with the language and lastly send us back to the train station. It was such enriching and fortunate trip to have learn 2 Japanese traditional crafts in a day and also met the most sincere and warmest person ever.

Delicious Udon for lunch

I decided to make a video to document this experience and showcase in addition to the main art work I am installing at the Studio Kura Artist Residency Exhibition. The most rewarding affirmation is the unexpected surprise visit when Kayoko san and her friend turn up at our exhibition and see the video personally. I was on the verge of giving up on the videos due to lack of time for making the main art work and also the slow network, but now I’m glad to have sachttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPNLxKgYUFMrificed my sleep, it is definitely worth it!

Kayoko san watching the video and it happens to play at the part where her husband is making the Washi- Studio Kura Artist Residency Exhibition.

Having brought back all the Washi, I am going to utilise them well and create some art pieces out of these beautiful handmade papers. Check out their shop here.

*the Moriyama Kasuri Factory tour will be on the next post 🙂

AnyEveryLittleThings, Artist Residencies, Projects, Activities & Events

Artist Residency at Studio Kura

The new place I’ve been staying since 30 Nov for an artist residency at Studio Kura. Got a nice big room with an adjacent space for working. It’s on the top floor with a view of traditional Japanese house. #artistleecaijun #artresidency #room #roomwithview #topfloor #japanesehouse #studiokura #yuystudiotravel #kyushu #japan  #yuystudiotravel #studio #workspace #mezzanine #studiokura #nijomasue #kyushu #artistatwork

 

For the main exhibit and studio working space I will be using Studio Kura 1’s mezzanine. I have a thing for higher ground!

AnyEveryLittleThings, Projects, Activities & Events, Sky Island

Noise Singapore 2014 Bus-stop Advertisment

Been selected by Noise Singapore to showcase my work on ad panel at selected bus-stops. Enjoy this Sky Island #002 while waiting for your bus.

Date: 13 Mar-19 Mar 2014
Site No./ Face/ BS No./ Site

– 1225/ D/ TS/ NEW UPPER CHANGI ROAD AT TANAH MERAH MRT, NR SEC SCH, CHEERS/NTUC/FOOD CTRS, PTE EST
– 1521/ D/ B18/ BEDOK NORTH RD, BLK 185
– 4188/ A/ B10/ SEMBAWANG RD OS AVA HORTICULTURE CTR, AFT KHATIB CAMP/DIEPPE BARRACKS, BEF S’WANG AIRBASE/GOLF CLUB
– 4365/ C/ B02/ WOODLANDS AVENUE 7 OPP ADMIRALTY MRT, NR PRI SCH, FOOD/CONV CTRS
– 5256/ C/ B03/ HOLLAND ROAD OS CSC DEMPSEY CLUBHOUSE, NR CONDOS, GOLF COURSE, BOTANIC GDNS, EMBASSIES

Date: 20 Mar- 26 Mar 2014
Site No./ Face/ BS No./ Site

– 4063/ A/ B01/ CANBERRA ROAD OS BLK 311, OPP GOLF/C’TRY CLUB, NR SUN PLAZA/MRT/BUS INTER, PRI SCH
– 5327/ A/ B13/ JURONG TOWN HALL RD OS SCIENCE CTR, NR JURONG CTRL, INFORMATICS CAMPUS, GOLF CLUB
-5440/ A/ B05/ RIVER VALLEY ROAD OS UE SQUARE, NR MODH SULTAN PUBS, NR CLARKE QUAY, FOOD/CONV CTRS
– 5539/ B/ B04/ UPPER BUKIT TIMAH ROAD OS SPRINGDALE, NR PETROLS(3), CONDOS

Date: 27 Mar- 4 Apr 2014
Site No./ Face/ BS No./ Site

-1224/ D/ B13/ NEW UPPER CHANGI ROAD OS TANAH MERAH MRT, PTE EST, SEC SCH, NR CHEERS & NTUC/FOOD CTRS
– 3375/ D/ B06/ STEVEN ROAD BEFORE YMCA
– 3515/ B/ B03A/ YISHUN RING ROAD OS NORTHBROOK SEC SCH, NR SAFRA CLUB, YISHUN PARK
– 5035/ B/ B08/ BOON LAY WAY BEF JURONG EAST ST 11, NR IMM, TOWARDS, JURONG CTRL, BUS/MRT INTER
-7192/ A/ B15/ JALAN BAHAR OS BLK 271A, BETW JURONG POLICE DIV HQ & SCDF JLN BAHAR CAMP

NAC6S_Indiv2-05

IMG_7374b copyIMG_7610 copyIMG_7615 copy

AnyEveryLittleThings

Teru Teru Bozu Project

Teru Teru Bozu (literally “shine shine monk”)

A little traditional hand-made doll made of white paper or cloth that Japanese farmers began hanging outside of their window by a string. This amulet is supposed to have magical powers to bring good weather and to stop or prevent a rainy day. “Teru” is a Japanese verb which describes sunshine, and a “bōzu” is a Buddhist monk. Traditionally, if the weather does turn out well, eyes are drawn in and a libation of holy sake (神酒) is poured over them, and they are washed away in the river.Today, children make teru-teru-bōzu out of tissue paper or cotton, string and hang them from a window when they wish for sunny weather, often before a outdoor trip. Hanging it upside down – acts like a prayer for rain. They are still a very common sight in Japan.

Origin…

Hiyoribo (日和坊)– The Weather Monk

Hiyoribo is a legend that has been passed down for many years in Japan. He is said to come from the mountains of Hitachi-no-kuni—modern day Chiba prefecture—and his season is the summertime. Hiyoribo is said to be a yokai (Spirit) who brings sunny weather, and who cannot be seen on rainy days.

Toriyama Seiken illustrated the Hiyoribo in his picture-scroll “Supplement to the Hundred Demons of the Past,” and explained that this yokai was the origin of teru teru bozu. He said that when children hang up teru teru bozu and pray to them to bring sunshine into the rain, it is actually the spirit of the Hiyoribo that they are praying to.

Nursery Rhyme

There is a famous Japanesenursery rhyme, associated with teru teru bozu, written by Kyoson Asahara and composed by Shinpei Nakayama, that was released in 1921. Like many nursery rhyme, this song is rumored to have a darker history than it first appears. It allegedly originated from a story of a monk who promised farmers to stop rain and bring clear weather during a prolonged period of rain which was ruining crops. When the monk failed to bring sunshine, he was executed. Many Japanese folk historians, however, believe this story and others regarding the origins of teru teru bozu may have originated from long after the tradition had become widespread, most likely in an attempt to refine the image of the doll. It is more likely that the “bōzu” in the name refers not to an actual Buddhist monk, but to the round, bald monk-like head of the doll, and “teru teru” jokingly referring to the effect of bright sunlight reflecting off a bald head.

Lyric…

Teru-teru-bōzu, teru bōzu
Ashita tenki ni shite o-kure
Itsuka no yume no sora no yo ni
Haretara kin no suzu ageyo

Teru-teru-bōzu, teru bōzu
Ashita tenki ni shite o-kure
Watashi no negai wo kiita nara
Amai o-sake wo tanto nomasho

Teru-teru-bōzu, teru bōzu
Ashita tenki ni shite o-kure
Sore de mo kumotte naitetara
Sonata no kubi wo chon to kiru zo

Translation…

Teru-teru-bozu, teru bozu
Do make tomorrow a sunny day
Like the sky in a dream sometime
If it’s sunny I’ll give you a golden bell

Teru-teru-bozu, teru bozu
Do make tomorrow a sunny day
If you make my wish come true
We’ll drink lots of sweet sake

Teru-teru-bozu, teru bozu
Do make tomorrow a sunny day
but if it’s cloudy and I find you crying (i.e. it’s raining)
Then I shall snip your head off

This project investigate the connection between narrative (folklore of Teru), nature (weather) and humanity (cultural practice). A logbook will be recording the weather, teru teru bozu and activities involved daily.